USA Study Visa Requirements for Indian Students – F1, M Visas

PURSUE YOUR HIGHER EDUCATION IN ONE OF THE US UNIVERSITIES

The United States is the world’s leading student destination. It offers unparalleled scope for students from all streams to study and excel in their chosen fields. Coupled with an economy that requires new talent every year, it is the ideal destination for students looking to study and make a life after graduation. With a US student visa, it is possible to study in USA.

Y-Axis offers authoritative support students need to study in US universities with a US student visa. Our understanding of the US education system and vast experience with its student visa process make us your best bet to study in the US.

WHY STUDY IN THE USA?

The US universities are able to provide the best possible platform to international students with a student visa. This is evident from their high rankings making it worthwhile to study in USA. The country’s education system offers the most comprehensive coursework to students with an equal emphasis on both practical and theoretical learning.

  • Affordable Education
  • Diversity and Flexibility
  • Outstanding support system for overseas students
  • Healthy and Safe Communities
  • Access to internships
  • Exciting Campus Lifestyle
COST OF STUDYING IN THE USA

The US Universities fall under two major categories: public-funded and private institutions.
International students’ tuition expenses at state schools are based on non-resident costs, which are still usually less expensive than those of private universities. This is excluding the student visa fees. You will need approximately $10,000 to $55,000 annually to cover your tuition fees when you study in USA.

Study Program Approximate tuition fees in USD$
Undergraduate Bachelor Degree $15,000 to $40,000 per year
Graduate programs $20,000 to $40,000 per year
Doctoral Degree $20,000 to $45,000 per year
UPCOMING INTAKES IN THE USA

US universities have 3 intakes.

Students have the option of choosing the term of their study from three main flexible intakes, Spring (January), Fall (September) and Summer (May) when they study in USA.

Intake 1: Fall Semester – It commences in August/September and is the major intake.

Intake 2: Spring Semester – It commences in January/February intake is also available.

Intake 3: Summer Semester – It commences in May/June and is available for selected Courses.

You will have to choose an intake that best suits your requirements and make your application accordingly. Remember the deadline to submit applications are usually a few months before the starting date of the semester. You will also have to plan your US student visa application to sync with your college application process.

Eligibility requirements for students in US universities:

Student Applicant

  • Students must be over 18 years of age.
  • International students can work on-campus up to 20 hours/week or less during the academic terms and full-time during the academic break periods including the summertime.
  • Off-campus employment requires some form of written or documented authorization issued by either the USCIS or OISS.
  • You must be currently in legal status and have been enrolled as a student on a F-1 student visa in the US for a minimum of one academic year to be eligible for any form of off-campus employment.

US Student Visa Requirements (F1 Visa)

You will generally need the following for your US Student Visa application for US universities:

  • A valid passport with a validity date at least six months beyond your period of stay.
  • Recent passport size photograph.
  • Confirmation page of DS-160.
  • Form I -20.
  • Payment of application fees for SEVIS.
  • Application as a non-immigrant.
  • Your University will make you aware of additional requirements if any prior to your application.
STEPS TO APPLY

Step 1: Apply to a US school and get accepted

The first step is to apply to (and eventually be accepted to) a US university. In the United States, most full-time undergraduate and graduate programs demand applications by December or January of each year. Admission notices are usually sent out in March and April.

Step 2: Get your school’s Form I-20 or DS-2019

After being accepted to a school, you’ll receive one of two forms: Form I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) for F-1 and M-1 students, and Form DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status for J-1 students.

Step 3: Pay the SEVIS I-901 fee

Go online and pay the I-901 SEVIS fee once you receive your I-20 or DS-2019 form from your school. The price is 350 USD for F-1/M-1 students and 220 USD for J-1 students once again. (Those in short-term J-1 visa programs will only have to pay $35 USD.)

Step 4: Locate a US Embassy or Consulate in Your Area

You must apply for an international student visa at the US embassy or consulate nearest to you (ideally, in the city or region in which you live). The US Department of State offers an online search for US embassies and consulates.

Please know that depending on which embassy you apply through, the process for obtaining a student visa in the United States may fluctuate slightly.

Step 5: Fill out the DS-160 form online

After that, fill out the Online Non-immigrant Visa Application (Form DS-160).

You will also select the US embassy where you will interview for your visa on this application.

Step 6: Make an appointment for your visa interview

Contact your nearest US embassy or consulate (preferably, the one you listed on your online application) to organize your visa interview after you’ve filed Form DS-160.

Step 7: Make payment for your visa application fee.

After that, pay the application fee of 160 USD. This charge is the same regardless of where you apply or where you are from.

It’s important to note that the exact date you pay this charge will differ based on your embassy.

Step 8: Attend your visa interview

The interview is the final major step in the visa application process. This interview will determine whether or not you are granted a student visa in the United States.

Step 9: Pay the visa issuance fee

After being authorized for a student visa in the United States, certain students are required to pay a visa issuance fee. Whether or not you must pay this fee is determined by your nationality and the reciprocity agreement your country has with the United States. You can use a chart on the US visas website to discover if you have to pay a visa issuance fee.

Step 10: Get Your Visa

Your embassy will return your passport to you with your new visa in it if you’ve completed all of the requirements above and gained approval for an international student visa to the United States. It’s worth noting that certain embassies will ask you to pick it up in person, while others will simply ship it back to you.

The length of time it takes for your visa to be processed varies by embassy.

After You Graduate:
  • F1 Student Visa holders are eligible for up to 12 months of OPT (optional practical training) on completion of graduation. That means you can work for a year after you finish your studies.
  • It is temporary employment permission allowing students the opportunity to gain practical experience in their field of study.
  • After that, you’ll be required to apply for a work visa if you have to continue working in the US. You can remain in the US up to 60 days after the completion of your course in US universities even if you don’t have a job offer or haven’t applied for OPT
Student Dependent Visa

The student dependent visa is called the F2 Visa. The F2 visa is a non-immigrant dependent visa where the immediate family members of the F1 student visa holders can come to the US. Dependents include the spouse and unmarried children under the age of 21 of the individual who is studying in US.

Eligibility conditions for the F2 visa
  • Must be the spouse of an F1 student visa holder.
  • Must be the dependent child (under 21 years and unmarried) of an F1 visa holder.
  • Applicant must have enough financial resources to support the family in the US
F2 visa requirements
  • Passport (both original and photocopies)
  • Visa application confirmation (DS-160)
  • A photograph conforming to U.S. visa rules
  • Birth certificate for dependent children
  • Marriage certificate for spouses
  • Visa fee payment receipt
  • Applicant’s I-20 form
  • Copy of F1 visa holder’s I-20 form
  • Applicant’s bank statements, tax records, and employment documents as proof of financial stability
Benefits Of F2 Visa

Extended visa stays

If the primary F1 student visa holder extends his / her stay, then the F2 visa dependents are also automatically eligible to apply for the extension. Filing Form I-539 is enough to renew your F2 visa along with proof of your financial status.

Change of visa status

You can enter the U.S. on an F2 visa and subsequently request a change of visa status. By enrolling in a US higher education program in US universities, you can change your visa status to F1. If you find an appropriate job, you can request a change of visa status.

Getting a Green Card

While you get a Green Card automatically when your primary F1 visa holder receives one, you are also eligible to apply for one on your own. You can change your visa status to a different one which allows for dual purpose (e.g., L1 visa) and then apply for a Green Card. If you find employment, you become eligible for a Green Card.

Access to healthcare

F2 visa holders have access to medical services and hospitals in the US. However, if you plan on a long stay or expect a medical situation, it makes sense to buy a health insurance plan to cover the high costs of health care.

F2 VISA RESTRICTIONS
  • No permission to work
  • Not eligible for Social Security Number
  • Not allowed to pursue higher education
  • Cannot enter the U.S. before the F1 student visa holder
  • As you are not eligible to work, you can’t get a Social Security Number (SSN).
  • You can’t get employment in the United States on an F2 visa. But you’re allowed to do unpaid voluntary work
  • You cannot do a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree program in US universites on the F2 visa. Yet you are eligible for recreational and vocational training courses. Dependent children on an F2 visa can complete primary, middle and high school education. If you are looking to pursue higher studies, you must first apply for a visa status change.
  • You must either be accompanied by the primary F1 visa holder or fly later after the F1 holder for first-time travel to the U.S. on an F2 visa. You can’t enter the United States before the F1 visa holder. This only applies when you are first entering the U.S. and not for subsequent travel
M1 VISA – STUDENT VISA (VOCATIONAL COURSE)

M1 visa is a type of non-immigrant student visa issued by the USCIS to foreign students looking to study in the United States, but not every student receives an M1 visa. This is primarily intended for those who want to pursue vocational training in the U.S.

Students can enter the US with an M1 visa and complete their full-time vocational studies.

What can you do with an M1 visa

Using the M1 visa, as a student, you can obtain a driver’s license, a bank account based in the U.S., access to health care services, and apply for work under certain restrictions.

What you cannot do-.

Requirements for student visa application

  • You cannot apply for non-academic or vocational training courses in the US
  • You meet the minimum education qualification required for admission into the vocational course.
  • You were admitted by a U.S.-based educational school and got the Form I-20.
  • You have the appropriate level of proficiency in English
  • You’ve shown you’ve got enough funds to cover your expenses while you’re in the US
  • You have permanent residence in your country of origin
  • You have no intention of remaining in the US and will leave after your education is complete
  • The institution is convinced that the education you are receiving will benefit your country of origin

Documents required

  • Passport valid for at least six months
  • DS-160 confirmation
  • Visa appointment letter
  • Recent photographs
  • Fee receipts
  • Educational certificates
  • Proof of financial stability

Apply for full-time employment outside the campus

Study the full-time course as part-time operation (which means strict monitoring of attendance)

HOW Y-AXIS CAN HELP YOU?

The US visa application process can be a daunting prospect. Y-Axis will be by your side and assist you throughout the process. Y-Axis consultants are experienced and well-versed with the intricacies of the US immigration process. Your dedicated consultant will help you:

  • Identify and collect all your documents
  • Complete the visa documents checklist
  • Create your application package
  • Help to fill the various forms and applications accurately
  • Updates & follow up
  • Interview preparation

TOP UNIVERSITIES IN US

The QS World University Rankings 2022 includes 150 universities in the US.

QS World University Rankings 2022 – Top Universities in the US

 

Serial No.

Global Rank

University

1

#1

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2

#3

Stanford University

3

#5

Harvard University

4

#6

California Institute of Technology (Caltech)

5

#10

University of Chicago

6

#13

University of Pennsylvania

7

#14 [tied]

Yale University

8

#19

Columbia University

9

#20

Princeton University

10

#21

Cornell University

11

#23 [tied]

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

12

#25

Johns Hopkins University

13

#30

Northwestern University

14

#32

University of California, Berkeley (UCB)

15

#40

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

16

#42

New York University (NYU)

17

#48

University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

18

#52

Duke University

19

#53 [tied]

Carnegie Mellon University

20

#60

Brown University

21

#67

University of Texas at Austin

22

#75 [tied]

University of Wisconsin-Madison

23

#82[tied]

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

24

#85 [tied]

University of Washington

25

88

Georgia Institute of Technology

26

94

Rice University

27

#96

Pennsylvania State University

28

#100

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

29

#107

Washington University in St. Louis

30

#112 [tied]

Boston University

31

#112 [tied]

University of Southern California

32

#116

Purdue University

33

#120

The Ohio State University

34

#138

University of California, Davis

35

#146

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB)

36

#154

University of Rochester

37

#157

Michigan State University

38

#158

University of Maryland, College Park

39

#160

Emory University

40

#161

Case Western Reserve University

41

#163 [tied]

University of Pittsburgh

42

#168 [tied]

Texas A&M University

43

#173 [tied]

University of Florida

44

#186 [tied]

University of Minnesota Twin Cities

45

#191 [tied]

Dartmouth College

46

#216 [tied]

Arizona State University

47

#218

Vanderbilt University

48

#222

University of Notre Dame

49

#226 [tied]

University of Virginia

50

#232

University of California, Irvine

51

#246 [tied]

University of Massachusetts Amherst

52

#248 [tied]

Georgetown University

53

#251

University of Colorado Boulder

54

#252

Yeshiva University

55

#264 [tied]

Rutgers University–New Brunswick

56

#268 [tied]

The University of Arizona

57

#275 [tied]

Tufts University

58

#285 [tied]

University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

59

#300 [tied]

North Carolina State University

60

#311 [tied]

Indiana University Bloomington

61

#311 [tied]

University of Miami

62

#340 [tied]

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

63

#342

Northeastern University

64

#346

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

65

#347 [tied]

University of California, Santa Cruz

66

#355

George Washington University

67

#358 [tied]

University of Utah

68

#378 [tied]

Stony Brook University, State University of New York

69

#387

University of Kansas

70

#388 [tied]

University at Buffalo SUNY

71

#403

University of California, Riverside

72

#414

University of Colorado, Denver

73

#427 [tied]

Washington State University

74

#429 [tied]

Wake Forest University

75

#431 [tied]

Colorado State University

76

#431 [tied]

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

77

#436 [tied]

Tulane University

78

#444

Illinois Institute of Technology

79

#455 [tied]

Brandeis University

80

#455 [tied]

University of Iowa

81

#461 [tied]

Colorado School of Mines

82

#475

Florida State University

83

#476

University of Missouri, Columbia

84

#477 [tied]

University of Texas Dallas

85

#494 [tied]

Boston College

86

#494 [tied]

Iowa State University

87

511-520

Missouri University of Science and Technology

88

511-520

Wayne State University

89

531-540

Lehigh University

90

531-540

Oregon State University

91

531-540

University of Delaware

92

541-550

The University of Georgia

93

541-550

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

94

561-570

The New School

95

571-580

University of Nebraska – Lincoln

96

581-590

University of South Florida

97

601-650

Clark University

98

601-650

Smith College

99

601-650

University of Cincinnati

100

601-650

University of South Carolina

101

651-700

American University

102

651-700

College of William and Mary

103

651-700

Drexel University

104

651-700

Howard University

105

651-700

Michigan Technological University

106

651-700

Syracuse University

107

651-700

University of Kentucky

108

651-700

University of Massachusetts Boston

109

651-700

University of New Mexico

110

651-700

University of Oklahoma

111

651-700

University of Oregon

112

651-700

University of Vermont

113

701-750

City University of New York

114

701-750

New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

115

701-750

Stevens Institute of Technology

116

701-750

University of Houston

117

701-750

Virginia Commonwealth University

118

751-800

Clarkson University

119

751-800

Georgia State University

120

751-800

Temple University

121

751-800

University at Albany SUNY

122

751-800

University of Central Florida

123

751-800

University of Denver

124

751-800

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

125

751-800

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

126

801-1000

Auburn University

127

801-1000

Binghamton University SUNY

128

801-1000

Clemson University

129

801-1000

Florida International University

130

801-1000

Fordham University

131

801-1000

George Mason University

132

801-1000

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis

133

801-1000

Kansas State University

134

801-1000

Louisiana State University

135

801-1000

Loyola University Chicago

136

801-1000

Oklahoma State University

137

801-1000

Rutgers University–Newark

138

801-1000

Seattle University

139

801-1000

Southern Methodist University

140

801-1000

Texas Tech University

141

801-1000

The University of Alabama

142

801-1000

University of Hartford

143

801-1000

University of Mississippi

144

801-1000

University of Missouri, Kansas City

145

801-1000

University of New Hampshire

146

801-1000

University of Texas at San Antonio

147

801-1000

University of Tulsa

148

801-1000

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

149

801-1000

University of Wyoming

150

801-1000

West Virginia University

FAQ
What are the requirements for a US Student Visa?

What are the requirements for a US Student Visa?
The US Student Visa requires submission of mandatory documents as well as supporting documents of academic and financial records. The following documents will be required:

  • A Passport that has a validity of minimum 6 months after your stay in the US
  • Print out of the online application form DS -160
  • Original and copy of the appointment letter for the interview
  • Form I – 20 sent by the US University/College where you will study
  • A confirmation receipt for payment of Visa fees
  • Bank statement for a minimum of 3 years that show adequate funds for paying for the first year (can be of parent/guardian)
  • Payslips
  • Original Marks sheet or Provisional certificates
  • Score sheet of exams like IELTS, GMAT, TOEFL, etc
What is the minimum IELTS score required to study in the US?

US Universities/Colleges expect a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 bands and the higher the score the better. Majority of them will accept the application for admission with at least 6.5 scores.

Can you work on a Student Visa?

Yes, international students can work in the United States while studying, although there are some limits. On-campus work is permitted for M-1 and F-1 visa holders in certain training programs. During their first year of school, they are not permitted to work outside the college.

How much does it cost for an Indian to study in the US?

Undergraduate course tuition fees range from $15,000 to $20,000 each year. Postgraduate courses cost anything from $7000 to $21,000 or more. This is determined by the program you select as well as the type of school you attend – private or public. Depending on your lifestyle, the monthly cost of living can range from $300 to $1000.

Is it possible for me to change universities or schools once I arrive in the US on a student visa?

Once you’ve arrived in the United States, you’ll be subject to the rules of the US Citizenship and Immigration Services. As a result, you are unable to move schools before finishing a year there. It is recommended that you consider your options thoroughly in order to avoid complications later..

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